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The 2014 Shakespeare In The Park Summer Season will consist of 8 productions totaling 56 performances over 10 weeks.
 

3 Kentucky Shakespeare Professional Productions

 
A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM
 
Directed by Matt Wallace
 
Preview June 11
 
June 12-22
 
HENRY V
 
Directed by Amy Attaway
 
Preview June 26
 
June 27-July 6
 
HAMLET
 
Directed by Matt Wallace
 
Preview July 10July 11-13Rotating Repertory Weeks (all 3 productions)July 15-271 Globe Players Student Production

LOVE’S LABOUR’S LOST

Preview July 30

July 31-August 3

 

4 Community Partners Productions in Rotating Repertory Over Two Weeks

AS YOU LIKE IT presented by Le Petomane Theatre Ensemble

August 5, 7, 9

PERICLES presented by Walden Theatre

August 6, 8, 10

KING LEAR presented by Savage Rose Classical Theatre

August 13, 15, 17

WOMEN OF WILL presented by Shoestring Productions

August 12, 14, 16

 

Now Playing
Kentucky Shakespeare presents the oldest free Shakespeare festival in the United States.

Shaking up Shakespeare: Jeffersonville Elementary students learn playwright’s work

April 4, 2012

By newsandtribune.com - JEROD CLAPP | Published: April 4, 2012

JEFFERSONVILLE — After the show, audience members talked a little about romance amidst feuding and the price two lovers were willing to pay to spend eternity together.

But these onlookers haven’t even started middle school yet.

Kentucky Shakespeare put on a version of “Romeo and Juliet” in which they explained some of the meaning of the language and themes of the play to a group of third- through fifth-graders at Riverside Elementary School. Students came from other schools in Greater Clark County Schools’ Gifted and Talented program.

Ryan Watson, one of the actors, said the show helped familiarize children with William Shakespeare’s work while helping them understand the subject matter.

“One thing we want to do as we bring down the more weighty subjects is to get them to focus on Shakespeare,” Watson said. “Using the vehicle of a play within a play, we’re able to take off the mask for a minute and explain that.”

Caitlyn Jennings, a fifth-grader at Riverside, said she thought the actors did a good job of conveying the play’s ideas to the audience.

“I got what the story was mainly about, how two families were fighting and the son and daughter in them fell in love,” Jennings said.

April Flaten, a parent volunteer for the day, said her son, Jared, was able to see the play. She said she knew her husband hadn’t read “Romeo and Juliet” until he got into college and she was glad her son was able to see it much earlier on.

“I think the more exposure you have, the better you’re going to be able to understand it,” Flaten said.

But outside of being able to enjoy the show and learn about it early on, Susan Stewart, advanced program coordinator, said getting used to Shakespeare early on had benefits for students that were more far-reaching.

“All people appreciate Shakespeare at some level,” Stewart said. “For our kids, we’re trying to raise that academic bar. We know kids at this age who get exposure to this kind of literature do better on the SAT.”

Stewart said students had been learning about comedies, tragedies and themes in plays for about four weeks.

But Watson said the play also helps students relate to it by using cues students would recognize, rather than relying strictly on the text from Shakespeare’s plays.

“We peppered the play with contemporary references that can break down the monotony, like Justin Bieber and the use of cell phones,” Watson said.

Stewart said with Shakespeare references used in everyday conversation, getting the ability to analyze and compare modern books to Shakespeare’s work would be helpful as they got older.

“The confidence and self esteem they can get from this going into middle or high school with that understanding of this literature is great,” Stewart said. “They can sort of say, ‘that’s no big deal. I saw that in the third grade.’”